Human rights This module gives teachers and pupils tools to reflect about the meaning of human rights

Introduction

Background information and didactical perspective

Philosophy for Children (P4C) is an approach that was developed by Professor Matthew Lipman, who was influenced by educational psychologists and philosophers such as Vygotsky, Piaget and Dewey as well as by the tradition of Socratic dialogue. P4C builds on higher order thinking (critical, creative and caring thinking), inquiring, reasoning, listening and dialogical skills. Children are encouraged to create their own philosophical questions. The facilitator supports children in their own thinking, reasoning and inquiring, as well as in building on each other’s ideas in a dialogue. In P4C the facilitator fosters student-led discussions on philosophical questions. The role of the facilitator is crucial to ensuring quality dialogue and progress, as well as integration within the curriculum. It is well documented that P4C has an impact on children's cognitive, personal, social and emotional development. P4C encourages children as well as young adults to think for themselves and develop dialogical skills.

Learning outcomes

Competencies
critical thinking, creative thinking, reflective skills, inquiry skills, dialogical skills
Human rights
  • Suitable age
    10-14
  • Time frame
    9 x 60 min.
  • Required materials
    board/flip chart;
  • Subjects / Topics
    Cosmopolitan issues

Lesson plan

Abbreviations:

  • A = Activity
  • D = Discussion
  • GW = Group work
  • HW = Homework
  • PW = Partnerwork
  • PTS = Previous Teacher’s Study
  • PO = Pupils opinions
  • PP = Pupil’s presentations
  • TP = Teacher’s presentation

Download

Phase Content Type of activity Media, Material

Introduction
(5 min.)

What is a right? What is an obligation?

Preparation
  • Teacher studies previously the leading idea Rights and obligations in order to have a guide to stimulate reflection in the students during the discussion raised by the exercise
  • Prepare a circle of chairs
Execution
  • Teacher hands out a copy of exercise What is a right? What is an obligation? to each pupil, then introduces subject asking students to answer the questions contained in M2, giving reasons for each of them
  • PTS
  • TP
M1
Leading idea “Rights and obligations”
M2
Exercise “What is a right? What is an obligation?”

Main section
(10 min.)

  • Students work individually on the exercise
  • PO

Discussion
(40 min.)

  • Teacher invites pupils to discuss the issues that they think are more relevant with their classmates, referring in particular to the last two questions of the exercise
  • D
Phase Content Type of activity Media, Material

Introduction
(10 min.)

Preparation
  • Prepare a circle of chairs
  • Hand out a copy of the Declaration of human rights
Execution
  • Teacher introduces subject reading the content of exercise The Declaration of Human Rights and asks the pupils to try to discover which obligation or obligations are connected to each of the rights that appears in the Declaration of Human Rights
  • TP
M3
Activity “The Declaration of Human Rights”

Discussion
(40 min.)

  • Pupils confront each other and discuss about which obligation or obligations they think are connected to each of the rights that appear in the Declaration of Human Rights giving reasons for their agreement
  • The exercise can be also done as an activity
  • D
M3
Activity “The Declaration of Human Rights”
Phase Content Type of activity Media, Material

Introduction
(5 min.)

Preparation
  • Prepare a circle of chairs
  • Prepare a flip chart
  • Hand out a copy of each exercise to each student
Execution
  • Teacher writes the questions listed in exercise Do children have the same rights as adults? on the flip chart. Then asks students to choose one or more questions to reflect on. After choosing the questions, the teacher divides students into groups and asks them to discuss the topics arisen by the questions and to make notes. Finally, asks students to share their own conclusions with each other
  • TP
M4
Exercise “Do children have the same rights and obligations as adults?”
Additional material
  • board/flip chart

Main section
(15 min.)

  • Students work into groups discussing on the topics and making notes about them
  • PO

Discussion
(30 min.)

  • Students share with each other their own conclusions
  • D
Phase Content Type of activity Media, Material

Introduction
(5 min.)

Preparation
  • Teacher studies previously the leading idea Rights in order to have a guide to stimulate reflection in the students during the discussion raised by the exercise
  • Prepare a flip chart
  • Hand out a copy of each exercise to each student
Execution
  • Teacher hands out a copy of exercise Rights and asks pupils to think about the questions
  • PTS
  • TP
M5
Leading idea “Rights”
M6
Exercise “Rights”
Additional material
  • board/flip chart

Main section
(35 min.)

  • Students work individually on the exercise
  • PO

Discussion
(10 min.)

  • Teacher invites pupils to discuss their answers and share their conclusions
  • D
Phase Content Type of activity Media, Material

Introduction
(5 min.)

Exploring Children’s Rights

Preparation
  • Teacher studies previously the leading idea Children’s Rights in order to have a guide to stimulate reflection in the students during the discussion raised by the exercise
  • Prepare a circle of chairs
  • Hand out a copy of each exercise to each student
Execution
  • Teacher hands out a copy of exercise Exploring children's rights to the pupils and introduces the subject asking students to think about and answer the questions in this exercise
  • PTS
  • TP
M7
Leading idea “Children’s rights”
M8
Exercise “Exploring children’s rights”

Main section
(15 min.)

  • Students work individually on the exercise and answer the questions
  • PO

Discussion
(30 min.)

  • Teacher invites pupils to discuss and reflect on the questions with their classmates
  • D
Phase Content Type of activity Media, Material

Introduction
(5 min.)

Do children have rights? Imaginary Island

Preparation
  • Teacher studies previously the leading idea Children’s Rights in order to have a guide to stimulate reflection in the students during the discussion raised by the exercise
  • Prepare a flip chart
  • Hand out a copy of each exercise to each student
Execution
  • Teacher asks pupils to think about children’s rights
  • TP
  • PO
M7
Leading idea “Children’s rights”
M9
Exercise “Do children have rights?”
Additional material
  • board/flip chart

Main section
(50 min.)

  • Step 1 Teacher hands out a copy of exercise Do children have rights?. Students work individually and think whether they agree or disagree with the statements
  • Step 2 Teacher invites pupils to discuss the statements and their reasons with their classmates
  • Step 3 Teacher hands out a copy of exercise Imaginery island and asks pupils to write a list with three rights their island should offer
  • Step 4 Teacher invites pupils to discuss the rights they think are important
  • PO
  • TP
  • D
M9
Exercise “Do children have rights?”
M10
Exercise “Imaginary Island”
Phase Content Type of activity Media, Material

Introduction
(5 min.)

Preparation
  • Prepare a circle of chairs
Execution
  • Teacher introduces subject asking pupils to make a list of their rights and to explain which conditions are necessary in enforcing them (e.g. the right to receive an education implies the need for a family to bring you up and a school near home; the right to food implies having access to food)
  • TP
M11
Exercise “Rights of children and youngsters”

Main section
(10 min.)

  • Students work individually writing their own list of the rights
  • PO

Discussion
(40 min.)

  • Step 1 In order to encourage discussion, teacher asks students the following questions: To what extent do you think the rights on your classmates’ lists are respected in your particular case? To what extent do you think those rights are present at school? In the rest of the country? In the rest of the world?
  • Step 2 After that, the teacher emphasizes the existence of other rights, (some of which appear in the exercise Children rights). These other rights are probably unknown to most students, and are therefore less likely to appear in spontaneous discussion. As the teacher goes through this new list, s/he could ask them the same question s/he asked about their own lists
  • D
M12
Exercise “Children rights”
Phase Content Type of activity Media, Material

Introduction
(5 min.)

Preparation
  • Prepare a flip chart
  • Hand out a copy of each exercise to each student
Execution
  • Teacher introduces the subject by writing the quote in leading idea Privacy on a flip chart and asking the students to think about it
  • TP
M13
Leading idea “Privacy”

Main section
(15 min.)

  • Students work in pairs or groups and discuss whether they agree with the statement concerning privacy or not. They should justify their answer
  • PO

Discussion
(35 min.)

  • Teacher hands out a copy of exercise Privacy and asks pupils to discuss the questions with their classmates
  • D
M14
Exercise “Privacy”
Phase Content Type of activity Media, Material

Introduction
(5 min.)

What would happen if...?

Preparation
  • Teacher studies previously the leading idea Social pact in order to have a guide to stimulate reflection in the students during the discussion raised by the exercise
  • Prepare a flip chart
  • Hand out a copy of each exercise to each student
Execution
  • Teacher hands out a copy of exercise What would happen if... to each pupil, then introduces subject asking students to write a brief essay
  • PTS
  • TP
M15
Leading idea “Social pact”
M16
Exercise “What would happen if...”

Main section
(15 min.)

  • Students work individually on the exercise
  • PO

Discussion
(40 min.)

  • Teacher invites pupils to discuss with classmates the issues arisen from their brief essays
  • D